ACTIVITIES

HIKING AND SWIMMING
There are nearby lakes within driving distance and hiking trails that start right at the facility. A favorite lake for swimming and cliff jumping is Deep Lake, an easy trip by bicycle or car. It's located just 2.3 miles from camp. Be sure to take a Discover Pass for parking!

For families with small children, Park Lake is a great option. It's located within Sun Lakes State Park and has a roped-off swimming area with shallow waters and a large beach.

If you want to swim or hike don't forget to bring a swimsuit, water sandals, towels, a floatie, and hiking boots. The environment around camp is a rocky, dry desert and home to lots of wildlife. You may encounter snakes, scorpions, bats, and other animals. Please keep your distance.



There are many things to do and see around the area or along your travels to and from camp. Here are a few suggestions.

SUN LAKES PARK RESORT
This is a privately-owned resort located within the State Park. It's a great place for the family to play while you're taking workshops. The resort is located on the lake and offers swimming, boating, row boat and pedal boat rentals, 18-hole miniature golf, a 9-hole golf course, a gift shop, store, laundry facilities, and more.
Sun Lakes Park Resort








Photo by Tina Price
SOAP LAKE 
Soap Lake is a meromictic soda lake in the town of Soap Lake, Washington formed by the Missoula Floods at the foot of the Grand Coulee. The lake gets its name from the naturally occurring foam that gives its water a soapy appearance, and because the lake's mineral-rich waters have a slick, soapy feel. Soap Lake's mineral-rich waters have long been thought to have medicinal value. Many retreat attendees have ventured to Soap Lake to slather themselves with the medicinal muds. Soap Lake is located approximately 17 miles south of Sun Lakes-Dry Falls State Park.
Soap Lake Wikipedia Page



DRY FALLS INTERPRETIVE CENTER
The Dry Falls Interpretive Center is a short 10-minute jaunt by car. Admission is free to this very informative interpretive center which has displays, artifacts, a gift shop, and a 13-minute movie on the history of the area. Check out the views from either the huge picture window in the interpretive center or from the walkway that juts out over the basalt cliffs. Located approximately 2 miles north of the park on State Route 17. Don't forget to take a Discover Pass with you to park in the parking lot.
Dry Falls Interpretive Center



LENORE LAKE CAVES
Lenore Lake was formed by the Missoula Floods in the lower Coulee just north of the town of Soap Lake. An interesting area around Lake Lenore is the Lenore Caves. Located at the northern end of the lake, the Lenore Caves are a series of overhangs along the cliffs at the lake. They exist in one of the largest volcanic regions on Earth. The Lenore Caves were formed by the plucking of basalt from the walls of the coulees by the rush of melt waters and are geologically different from most caverns. They were later used as shelters by prehistoric man. Located approximately 20 miles south on State Route 17. It is a 1/4 mile hike from the parking lot to reach the caves.
Lenore Lake Caves



Photo by Rebecca Wolf-Nail
WILD HORSES MONUMENT
If your route to and from camp is along Interstate 90 from the West, you might consider stopping at the Wild Horses Monument in Vantage near the Columbia River. The 200-foot line of life-size charging horses, the creation of David Govedare of Chewelah, Washington, captures a mystical spirit from a time when real wild horses roamed the steppes. Grandfather Cuts Loose the Ponies is a sculpture of 15 wild horses that has crowned a prominent Central Washington hillside for more than a decade and is an inspiring sight for travelers along busy I-90 as you enter Grant County from the west. It is a 1/4-mile hike from the parking area up the hillside.
Wild Horses Monument